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1 day ago

ACPC Psychology

Tips to deal with lying5 Strategies to deal with lying

1. Remember, it’s normal. Catching your child in a lie can be frustrating but remembering that it’s a normal part of growing up can help us keep calm. We aren’t raising sociopaths! Just little ones whose motivation is to avoid punishment.

2. Don’t ask questions that you already know the answer to. If your son is smeared in chocolate cake, don’t say, ‘did you eat the chocolate cake?’ Of course he’ll lie! Instead say, ‘I can see you ate some chocolate cake. You must have been hungry huh?’ Then pause and ask, ‘Do you think I’m pleased or upset? Why? What should we do next time?’

3. Celebrate honesty. When your child is honest, even if they’ve done something wrong, acknowledge their truthfulness. Say, ‘I really appreciate that you’ve told me about what has gone wrong.’ Help them fix it and then talk about how to do better in the future. And don’t punish them or threaten to punish them for lying. Research shows this will cause more lying in the future.” They’ll be afraid of you.

4. Extract a simple promise. Studies show that children are less likely to lie once they have promised to tell the truth. But be gentle. If they tell you the truth, and then you punish them severely, they will be less likely to tell the truth in the future, promise or not.

5. Model good behaviour. As adults we are all guilty of social ‘white’ lies. Telling a friend that you have an appointment when you simply don’t want to go to their get together, for example. Our kids are looking to us to learn how to behave. Little white lies show them it’s okay to bend the truth.
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Tips to deal with lying

2 days ago

ACPC Psychology

What can ART not help with?! It seems to be very beneficial aiding in attention, stress reduction, increased creativity etc.Making any kind of visual #art, in any medium, can have positive outcomes, whether you are painting, drawing, sculpting, designing or collaging. And you don't have to be a trained or ‘talented’ artist to glean the growing list of #cognitive, #social, #emotional and #physical benefits that creating visual art has to offer.

🎨 Creating Art Can Keep You #Young—
Cognitive research out of Germany suggests that "the production of visual art improves effective interaction” between parts of the #brain. The study, conducted using fMRI brain scans on a small population of newly retired individuals between the ages of 62 and 70, concluded that making art could delay or even negate age-related decline of certain brain functions.

🎨 Making Art Improves #Concentration—
Dr. Michael Posner, Professor Emeritus at the University of Oregon explained that researchers think that performing any kind of art can improve your attention and focus.
“We know that the brain has a system of neural pathways dedicated to attention. We know that training these attention networks improves general measures of intelligence," he writes. "We can be fairly sure that focusing our attention on learning and performing an art — if we practice frequently and are truly engaged — activates these same attention networks."

🎨 Visual Art Can Make You Even More #Creative—
Studies suggest that the more you make art, the more creative you'll become. Research from 2015 published in the scientific journal NeuroImage revealed that college students partaking in drawing and painting actually became better artists. The increase of creativity was due to white matter in the prefrontal cortex reorganising. Whether you pick up a paint brush, sketch with some pens, or take a pottery class, making art can help you manage your mood, which also helps with creativity.

🎨 Drawing Improves Your #Memory—
A 2016 study led by Yale University researchers observed a phenomenon they termed the 'drawing effect' — that illustrating a word’s meaning always leads to the highest levels of memory recall. They found it helps commit information to memory by sketching it out. It’s thought this is because of the multi-sensory nature of the activity. Drawing incorporates, and potentially integrates, three distinct types of experience: semantic (the internal generation process that allows you to translate a word into a series of visual characteristics you can draw), motor (the planned movement of your hand as you draw), and visual (watching your drawing appear on the page). These components are linked in some way inside of our minds, so if you retrieve one small detail or component, that helps you reconstruct the full representation.

🎨 Art Making Reduces #Anxiety—
If you're feeling stressed, research has indicated that creating art can help you relax and unwind. A 2011 study found that art projects reduced anxiety levels in college students. What's more, The Journal of Korean Medical Science reported a 2018 study that that showed mindful art therapy helped ease anxiety symptoms in people with heart disease.

🎨 Art Makes You #Happier—
Unsurprisingly, creating visual artwork can not only reduce anxiety, but it has been shown to mitigate depression. A 2017 study discovered that people with moderate or severe depression who participated in art therapy showed major improvement after just ten one-hour-long sessions. A 2017 study conducted by researchers in Hong Kong found clay art therapy also seemed to have a positive impact on adults with depression.

🎨 Creating Art Can Help Ease Physical #Pain—
Matthew Solan, the Executive Editor of Harvard Men's Health Watch, has talked about art therapy being a type of psychotherapy that can help modify response to emotional and physical problems related to pain. It helps lower the perception of pain by moving mental focus away from the painful stimulus. It is not simply a distraction, but rather a way to teach a person how to relax and alter their mood, so the pain doesn’t control their emotional state. A study in the February 2018 issue of The Arts in Psychotherapy looked at almost 200 people hospitalised for a medical issue or surgery and found that participating in art therapy for an average of 50 minutes significantly lowered levels of pain.
“When people are in pain, they often lose their sense of control since their pain dictates what they can and cannot do,” says Kelsey A. Skerpan, an art therapist with Harvard-affiliated Massachusetts General Hospital. “Art therapy does not replace the need for pain medication, but it can be used as an effective complement and [can] reduce perceptions of pain experiences.”

🎨 Art Can Make You More #Resilient—
Interestingly enough, drawing or making any kind of visual art can make it easier to deal with stressful or upsetting situations. According to a 2014 study published in PLOS One, creating art can improve your overall cognitive functioning, and lead to more "psychological resilience in adulthood."

For some people, creating art is a passion or hobby, and for others it’s a great unknown. If you’ve never thought about incorporating visual arts into your life, the lives of your children, or into your teaching environment, consider giving it a try. Science has shown making art has many benefits and can change your brain for the better.

journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0101035

www.dana.org/article/how-arts-training-improves-attention-and-cognition/

www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1053811914009318

www.artsy.net/article/artsy-editorial-drawing-help-boost-memory

www.researchgate.net/publication/233285770_Arts-based_interventions_to_reduce_anxiety_levels_amon...

www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5852419/

www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/urban-survival/201803/mindfulness-art-therapy-can-reduce-depressi...

www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/11/171106100128.htm

www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/arts-and-health/201707/clay-art-therapy-and-depression

www.health.harvard.edu/blog/art-therapy-another-way-to-help-manage-pain-2018071214243

www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0197455617301053

www.bustle.com/p/drawing-can-change-your-brain-in-these-7-ways-according-to-science-15522774

#neurochild #brainscience #artists #youngartists
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What can ART not help with?! It seems to be very beneficial aiding in attention, stress reduction, increased creativity etc.

 

Comment on Facebook

Julie Tennant

Jenni Miller timing!!!!!!!

Leanne Wilson Hutchinson

2 days ago

ACPC Psychology

When a student is having a difficult time self regulating, perhaps consider ‘what’s underlying this behaviour? ‘What are the needs?’ ‘How can we support?’
Behaviour is communication after all..
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When a student is having a difficult time self regulating, perhaps consider ‘what’s underlying this behaviour? ‘What are the needs?’ ‘How can we support?’
Behaviour is communication after all..

3 days ago

ACPC Psychology

Trauma stemming from Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) has a significant impact on a child’s development including (but not limited to) their cognitive, language, learning, social, emotional and behavioural development. Such ACEs need to be taken into account when administering child assessments to avoid misdiagnosis or over diagnosis! ... See moreSee less

Trauma stemming from Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) has a significant impact on a child’s development including (but not limited to) their cognitive, language, learning, social, emotional and behavioural development. Such ACEs need to be taken into account when administering child assessments to avoid misdiagnosis or over diagnosis!

3 days ago

ACPC Psychology

A fantastic description to understand how medication can help some individuals with ADHD ... See moreSee less

A fantastic description to understand how medication can help some individuals with ADHD

5 days ago

ACPC Psychology

It’s not uncommon for us to hear that “they can do it sometimes, if they want to” - as this post describes, there can be an expectation that if a child can do something once, that they should be able to do it always. Would you want to be held to your best day?One of the most difficult parts of being autistic for me is the expectation that I must always repeat my best day. My successes are used as a measuring stick for what I am "capable of", without regard for the fact that I am not able to repeat my productivity every day. It's used as a weapon. It's used to discredit. It's used to determine whether or not I am putting in effort.

Presuming competence is one thing.

Presuming that people can always do things that they are sometimes able to do is harmful, as is the accusation that one isn't trying.

Some days, I'm the ball on the end of a Newton's Cradle, and the effort that I expend is visible.
Some days, I'm the still ball in the middle, carrying on the momentum silently, invisibly.
Every day, I am doing my best.

Image description: Black background with glowing Newton's Cradle, one ball swung up on the side. Text reads "one of the most difficult parts of being autistic is the expectation that I must always repeat my best day."
... See moreSee less

It’s not uncommon for us to hear that “they can do it sometimes, if they want to” - as this post describes, there can be an expectation that if a child can do something once, that they should be able to do it always. Would you want to be held to your best day?

5 days ago

ACPC Psychology

We have probably published this video before but it is worth watching it again. Very useful demonstration that can be practised with kids at home on how to deal with bullies! ... See moreSee less

Motivation Daily
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