About Us

The Adolescent Wellbeing Clinic is a partner clinic to AzzA's Child Psychology Clinic (ACPC). It aims to provide specific psychological services catered to adolescents and young people. 

Our team of psychologists hold extensive experience and knowledge in the assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of various mental health issues that young people may present with. We use evidence-based interventions such as  Cognitive Behavioural Therapy, Interpersonal Therapy,  Neuro psychotherapy, Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, Mindfulness as well as exposure based therapy.

Typical cases that present at our clinic include but are not limited to; major depressive disorders, anxiety disorders, panic disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorders, gender identity issues, eating disorders and body image  issues. 

As professionals working with young people, we understand the importance of rapport building, confidentiality and professionalism to ensure the best outcomes possible. At the Adolescent Well-being Clinic, we therefore ensure that every adolescent and young person is provided with the best attention and care.

As part of our holistic approach to therapy, and with the permission of the young person, we may work with their family members including parents, guardians, foster parents as well as grandparents. When deemed, appropriate or necessary, we may also work with associated schools and other educational/ work settings. 

Our Services

Anxiety

Anxiety

Anxiety

Anxiety is generally defined as feelings of worry, fear and apprehension or nervousness. When people present with an anxious presentation, they report experiencing excess

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Depression

Depression

Depression

Depression is generally defined as feelings of sadness and unhappiness that our that outweigh any positive feelings.

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Eating disorders

Eating disorders

Eating disorders

The causes for feeding and eating issues are complex as they generally arise from a combination of societal and individual factors interplaying. We live in a society whic

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Bullying

Bullying

Bullying

Bullying is generally defined as the behaviours that centre around making someone else feel inadequate or focusing on belittling them. It can range from harassment, physi

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LGBTIQ

LGBTIQ

LGBTIQ

Diversity of sexuality, sex, and gender is a natural and normal part of human experiences. Understanding our sexuality is about understanding the underlying sexual feelin

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Parent support

Parent support

Parent support

Parents and guardians of teens can often find it quite difficult to raise adolescents and young people, especially in this generation whereby things are significantly dif

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Meet Our Staff

Ms Azza Brown
Ms Azza Brown

Principal Clinical Psychologist

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Ms Amanda Kenyon
Ms Amanda Kenyon

Registered Psychologist

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Ms Nadia Rizzi
Ms Nadia Rizzi

Registered Psychologist

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Ms Stephanie Morse
Ms Stephanie Morse

Registered Psychologist (Clinical Registrar)

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Ms Karina Feldmann
Ms Karina Feldmann

Registered Psychologist

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Mr Jacky Au
Mr Jacky Au

Registered Psychologist

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Ms Mary Nguyen
Ms Mary Nguyen

Registered Psychologist

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Toula Moraitis
Toula Moraitis

Senior Administrator

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Our Services

Anxiety

Anxiety is generally defined as feelings of worry, fear and apprehension or nervousness. When people present with an anxious presentation, they report experiencing excessive levels of anxiety, quite frequently, which may prevent them from carrying out their day to day activities. They simply become overwhelmed with their feelings of fear and worry.

Anxiety impacts three main areas: 1) Our Body (physiological) 2) Our Thoughts (cognitive) and 3) Our Actions (Behaviour).

In other words, when someone is anxious and perceive a situation as threatening, they are likely to experience a number of physiological reactions (e.g. racing heart, hyperventilation, nausea etc.). They are also likely to think more catastrophically and negatively than typically expected. Common Examples may include "What if I make a mistake?" or "What if I say something and people laugh at me?" or "What if something bad happens to me?". Consequently, anxious people begin to avoid the objects or situations they fear in order to feel calmer and safe. 

People often wonder what causes anxiety, specifically in young people who are thought to be so "care free". Anxiety is often a combination of biological (e.g. genetic predisposition) and environmental factors (e.g. stress from HSC, changes, death of a family member/  family life stressors, an emotional shock following a traumatic event, some form of abuse/ trauma) which can lead a young person to developing anxiety.

At The Adolescent Well Being Clinic, we understand what it is like for young people with significant levels of stress and anxiety and how that might impact their everyday  social, emotional, and occupational functioning.  We are here to teach young people to understand their anxiety and empower them to manage it more effectively. 

Anxiety

Depression

Depression is generally defined as feelings of sadness and unhappiness that outweigh any positive feelings. Depression is more than just feeling sad or upset and it is a serious condition. When people present with a depressive presentation, they report experiencing feelings of irritability, sadness and stress most of the time.  Such feelings become long lasting and overwhelming impacting the way they think, feel, and behave. This may prevent them from functioning in their day-to-day lives.

There are a number of factors that can affect the way we think feel and behave. Some people may develop depression following a stressful life event (e.g. bullying, grief and loss, discrimination, family breakup, etc.). Initially, depression my start with feelings of sadness significant stress or anxiety. However, over time such feelings can become more intense and overwhelming impacting the way we feel about ourselves and others.

Depression is very common.  According to psychological research, one in 16 young people between 16 and 24 years of age can experience a level of depression each year.  It is found that girls are more likely than boys to experience depression however; girls are more vocal than boys and are therefore more likely to speak to others about their feelings and seek help. 

 At the Adolescent Well-being Clinic, we understand how depression can make young person feel stressed out, down, and completely isolated despite having family and friends. We believe that taking action by speaking to a professional is a proactive way to tackle such feelings. We therefore encourage young people to seek help rather than ignore how they feel. Seeking help is the bravest thing that a young person can do especially when they're feeling down. We are here to listen.

Depression

Eating disorders

Body image issues and eating disorders generally arise from a combination of societal and individual factors interplaying. We live in a society which gives us messages about the importance of size and shape. We are constantly bombarded with messages that 'we aren't good enough as we are' and 'the need to try this new diet/product/regime' to rectify this.

For young people, being constantly surrounded by these messages and experiencing an individual life stressor such as peer pressure, unrealistic self-expectations, life crisis or transition, focusing on their body or what they eat can become a way of coping or getting through these difficult times. Unfortunately, when the body is exposed to periods of restriction, starvation, binging or purging it endures a significant amount of distress. The medical and physical risks are significant even if the eating issue/disorder has only been experienced for a short time. Early identification of an eating issue/ disorder in young people is therefore essential since it can have a major impact on a young people's brain and body development.

At The Adolescent Wellbeing Clinic, we provide individual, group and family based therapies to adolescents, who may be experiencing any type of a specific eating disorder including; Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia Nervosa and Binge Eating Disorders. We also take a much wider definition, assisting young people who may also have an unhealthy relationship to food or body image. E.g. Food is categorised as 'good' or 'bad', Food control as a coping strategy, Yo-yo dieting, Food and/or how we look as primary focus of living.

Taking a broader definition allows us to capture the bigger issues associated with the development and perpetuation of body image issues and associated eating disorders. We aim for you and your loved ones to feel supported and guided throughout the treatment program towards a healthier mind and a healthier lifestyle.

Eating disorders

Bullying

Bullying is generally defined as the behaviours that centre around making someone else feel inadequate or focusing on belittling them. It can range from harassment, physical harm (i.e. physical bullying), repeatedly demeaning speech (i.e. verbal bullying) and ostracising individuals (i.e. emotional bullying). Bullying is an active process which involves the intention of bringing another person down.  

Cyber bullying is one of the most popular types of bullying in this generation and is becoming very serious problem for young people. It is a type of bullying or harassment that is achieved through the use of technology, for example through using instant messaging, self on text messages and online social networks. Because it can be shared widely and would reach lots of people quickly, it can be quite dangerous and hurtful for young people. It can also cause real humiliation because the bullying becomes exposed to the public, the information is difficult takedown or remove and affect the young person in their own home making it difficult to escape the bullying.

Bullying can impact people in a number of ways. It can make person feel guilty like it is their fault, hopeless and stuck like they can't escape the situation, and isolated often feeling that there is no one to help. It can also make a person feel like they cannot socially fit in, depressed and rejected in their social environment. This leaves the person feeling stressed out wondering what to do and why this is occurring to them.

At the Adolescent Well being Clinic. we understand that bullying can make a person feel anxious, depressed and isolated. We therefore believe that no young person should go through it on their own. We are here to listen, empower and guide young people in dealing with bullying by teaching them ways to manage such stressful situations. 

Bullying

LGBTIQ

The LGBTIQ community are minority groups based on sexual and gender orientation. These non-heterosexual and non-cisgender members are more likely to experience intolerance, discrimination, harassment and the threat of violence than those from mainstream society. This is because some people in society find it difficult to accept people who are different whether because of their race their sex and sexuality their religion the list goes on. They might therefore discriminate against people, bully them, or sometimes act aggressively. 

Such obstacles are amplified for LGBTIQ identifying youth. Their transition from child-hood to adulthood is a critical developmental challenge as it prompts the articulation and rediscovery of their personal identity. Indeed, such stressors are experienced by all adolescents. This includes biological changes, reorganisation of peer social networks and changes in their relationships with household members.

These sub-groups however face additional ‘gay-related’ nuanced obstacles, specifically when it comes to disclosing their sexual orientation to family, friends and their wider community. At the Adolescent Wellbeing Clinic, we provide support for young individuals wishing to discover the relationships between themselves and their sexual/gender identity in a safe and welcoming environment.  

LGBTIQ

Parent support

Parents and guardians of teens can often find it quite difficult to raise adolescents and young people, especially in this generation where things are significantly different. When a teen has some kind of a problem, it is often the case that the parent or guardian is impacted as well. Young people can display having a problem by withdrawing themselves from family members, lashing out at family members or displaying increased challenging behaviour. It can also be quite difficult to figure out what is troubling the young person and what can be done to best support them. 

At the Adolescent Wellbeing Clinic, we provide support and assistance to parents and guardians of young people. Sessions aim at providing a setting whereby carers of the young person can openly exchange information, receive support and guidance to examine ways to best support their adolescent. Through psychoeducation and coaching, we aim at guiding parents or guardians in understanding a specific presentation and teach them ways on how to improve the communication and relationship with their teen. 

Parent support
Life line
Kidshelpline
Reachout
Youth Beyond Blue
Mentor You
SmilingMind
Mindspot
The Butterfly Foundation
NDIS
Minus18

Contact Us

If you are a parent: Please contact us directly for a FREE 10 minute consult with a psychologist to discuss your concerns about your teen so that we ensure that we are the right place to best support your teen. 

If you are a teen: Please contact us directly for a quick chat or email us directly (by filling in the custom form) if you have any questions about who we are, what we do and how we can best support you. 

Location

Illawong Office
Suite 1, Illawong Village Shopping Centre, 273 Fowler Road Illawong NSW 2234

Westmead Office
Suite 20, Level 3 Westmead Children's Hospital Medical Centre
Hainsworth St, Westmead NSW 2145

phone number

Illawong Office
+61 2 9541 1177

Westmead Office
+61 2 9541 1177